Natural History Arts
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Common Murre Egg #1

Common Murre Egg #1

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2014, all rights reserved.  

Watercolor on Arches, 5 x 7"

$85 framed

Egg Series

Several years ago, I did a drawing exercise:  Every day I drew an egg.  I’d change the position, the lighting, the medium I used, and eventually I accumulated well over 100 egg sketches, which I keep in an old lunchbox.  At first I drew chicken eggs from the fridge, but at one point we had to take a trip out of town.  I couldn’t give up my daily egg sketch, but even hardboiled eggs wouldn’t have survived the trip.  So I poked around online, and discovered that it’s possible to get replicas of wild birds’s eggs.  (The real ones are federally protected, in case you’re wondering.)  I bought a Great Blue Heron egg replica, hand stitched a little case for it, and it became my traveling egg.  Of course, I couldn’t stop there.  More replica eggs followed, and egg reference books, and visits to Bell Museum.  It’s very easy to get hooked on eggs.  I find them to be lovely, evocative painting subjects.  They aren’t always what they seem to be.  Eggs are simultaneously extremely strong and easily broken, and they hold secrets.  They are self-contained, infinitely variable, and hide quite cleverly in plain sight.

Owl Eggs, Day

Owl Eggs, Day

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Watercolor on Arches, 10.5 x 7.75"

$500 framed

Egg Series

Several years ago, I did a drawing exercise:  Every day I drew an egg.  I’d change the position, the lighting, the medium I used, and eventually I accumulated well over 100 egg sketches, which I keep in an old lunchbox.  At first I drew chicken eggs from the fridge, but at one point we had to take a trip out of town.  I couldn’t give up my daily egg sketch, but even hardboiled eggs wouldn’t have survived the trip.  So I poked around online, and discovered that it’s possible to get replicas of wild birds’s eggs.  (The real ones are federally protected, in case you’re wondering.)  I bought a Great Blue Heron egg replica, hand stitched a little case for it, and it became my traveling egg.  Of course, I couldn’t stop there.  More replica eggs followed, and egg reference books, and visits to Bell Museum.  It’s very easy to get hooked on eggs.  I find them to be lovely, evocative painting subjects.  They aren’t always what they seem to be.  Eggs are simultaneously extremely strong and easily broken, and they hold secrets.  They are self-contained, infinitely variable, and hide quite cleverly in plain sight.

Wishing Moon

Wishing Moon

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved. Photo by Jerry Mathiason.   

Watercolor & colored pencil on Arches, 8 x 10"

$600 framed

Protection Series

Keeping oneself safe from harm is critical to all living beings. Plants and animals have all sorts of amazing adaptations for self-protection, from poisonous venoms to dramatic coloration that wards off predators. As endlessly creative human beings, we often go beyond what’s necessary (nuclear bombs) or craft odd, illusory forms of protection such as tinfoil hats, masks, blindfolds, conjuring and magical thinking. We use these tools to create a sense of safety, to find a way out of a tight space, or to frighten off someone else who might pose a threat. Where and how do we feel safe, and is that safety real or imagined?

Snow Sky

Snow Sky

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Watercolor on Arches, 10 x 13"

$800 framed

Snow Sky

There’s something quite satisfying about painting one’s own studio space.  My studio is a comfortable, calming place where focus comes easily, and like many painters before me, I want to memorialize its quirks.  I particularly love the old windows in the Northrup King Building, and one day something about the combination of the windowpanes, the power lines and that white, snow-is-coming sky really struck me.  The Raven seems to like it, too. 

Why Did You Invite Me?

Why Did You Invite Me?

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Watercolor on Arches, 19.5 x 11.5"

SOLD

Limited edition prints $125

Why Did You Invite Me?

In Aesop’s fable, the fox and the crane are the ultimate ”frenemies,” enemies who keep trying to be friends.  The fox invites the crane over for dinner, and serves soup in a shallow bowl from which the crane can’t drink.  The crane returns the favor by inviting the fox to dine on soup served in a tall, skinny vase.  

I chose to paint the moment when these two beautiful creatures, the Sandhill Crane and the Red Fox (both can be spotted here in Minnesota), are staring each other down, each one wondering why he or she is bothering with the other and yet for some reason neither one wants to simply walk away.  Bad friendships are a universal and mysterious thing, and obviously something that’s as old as Aesop.  Why do we tolerate them?

 

No Regrets

No Regrets

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2014, all rights reserved.

Watercolor on Arches, 14 x 10"

$800 framed

Osprey Variations

Osprey Variations

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2013, all rights reserved.  

Watercolor on Arches, 11 x 8.5"

SOLD

Egg Series

Several years ago, I did a drawing exercise:  Every day I drew an egg.  I’d change the position, the lighting, the medium I used, and eventually I accumulated well over 100 egg sketches, which I keep in an old lunchbox.  At first I drew chicken eggs from the fridge, but at one point we had to take a trip out of town.  I couldn’t give up my daily egg sketch, but even hardboiled eggs wouldn’t have survived the trip.  So I poked around online, and discovered that it’s possible to get replicas of wild birds’s eggs.  (The real ones are federally protected, in case you’re wondering.)  I bought a Great Blue Heron egg replica, hand stitched a little case for it, and it became my traveling egg.  Of course, I couldn’t stop there.  More replica eggs followed, and egg reference books, and visits to Bell Museum.  It’s very easy to get hooked on eggs.  I find them to be lovely, evocative painting subjects.  They aren’t always what they seem to be.  Eggs are simultaneously extremely strong and easily broken, and they hold secrets.  They are self-contained, infinitely variable, and hide quite cleverly in plain sight.

 

Dinner Plans

Dinner Plans

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  Photo by Jerry Mathiason. 

Watercolor & colored pencil on Arches, 12 x 20"

$1500 framed

Limited edition prints $125

Fishing Lure Series

I love lures. They’re fascinating objects which have a purpose, yet they often have a touch of whimsy and personality in their designs. Even though I’ve never done anything more advanced than bobber fishing for panfish, I have a tackle box full of big, elaborate lures. I just bought them because I liked them. 

Recently, it occurred to me that lures would be interesting to paint, so I dragged the tackle box out of the garage and rummaged through it. Such treasures:  shiny, perfect lures I’d bought and, of course, never used next to old, beat-up ones that had belonged to my father. In this series, I’ve combined fishing lures with grocery lists and other found papers to evoke thoughts about fishing and why it’s such a big part of the culture here in Minnesota. 

If you have a special lure, use the Contact page to get in touch with me about commissioning a painting. There's no better way to preserve your greatest fishing stories than a one-of-a-kind work of art.  

The 98th Try Is the Charm

The 98th Try Is the Charm

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved. Photo by Jerry Mathiason.  

Watercolor & colored pencil on Arches, 12 x 20"

$1500 framed

Limited edition prints $125

Fishing Lure Series

I love lures. They’re fascinating objects which have a purpose, yet they often have a touch of whimsy and personality in their designs. Even though I’ve never done anything more advanced than bobber fishing for panfish, I have a tackle box full of big, elaborate lures. I just bought them because I liked them. 

Recently, it occurred to me that lures would be interesting to paint, so I dragged the tackle box out of the garage and rummaged through it. Such treasures:  shiny, perfect lures I’d bought and, of course, never used next to old, beat-up ones that had belonged to my father. In this series, I’ve combined fishing lures with grocery lists and other found papers to evoke thoughts about fishing and why it’s such a big part of the culture here in Minnesota.   

If you have a special lure, use the Contact page to get in touch with me about commissioning a painting. There's no better way to preserve your greatest fishing stories than a one-of-a-kind work of art.

Long Weekend

Long Weekend

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved. Photo by Jerry Mathiason. 

Watercolor & colored pencil on Arches, 9 x 12"

$900 framed

Fishing Lure Series

I love lures. They’re fascinating objects which have a purpose, yet they often have a touch of whimsy and personality in their designs. Even though I’ve never done anything more advanced than bobber fishing for panfish, I have a tackle box full of big, elaborate lures. I just bought them because I liked them. 

Recently, it occurred to me that lures would be interesting to paint, so I dragged the tackle box out of the garage and rummaged through it. Such treasures:  shiny, perfect lures I’d bought and, of course, never used next to old, beat-up ones that had belonged to my father. In this series, I’ve combined fishing lures with grocery lists and other found papers to evoke thoughts about fishing and why it’s such a big part of the culture here in Minnesota.   

If you have a special lure, use the Contact page to get in touch with me about commissioning a painting. There's no better way to preserve your greatest fishing stories than a one-of-a-kind work of art.

Working Hard

Working Hard

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2016, all rights reserved.

Watercolor & colored pencil on Arches, 9 x 12"

$900 framed

Limited edition prints $125

Fishing Lure Series

I love lures. They’re fascinating objects which have a purpose, yet they often have a touch of whimsy and personality in their designs. Even though I’ve never done anything more advanced than bobber fishing for panfish, I have a tackle box full of big, elaborate lures. I just bought them because I liked them. 

Recently, it occurred to me that lures would be interesting to paint, so I dragged the tackle box out of the garage and rummaged through it. Such treasures:  shiny, perfect lures I’d bought and, of course, never used next to old, beat-up ones that had belonged to my father. In this series, I’ve combined fishing lures with grocery lists and other found papers to evoke thoughts about fishing and why it’s such a big part of the culture here in Minnesota.   

If you have a special lure, use the Contact page to get in touch with me about commissioning a painting. There's no better way to preserve your greatest fishing stories than a one-of-a-kind work of art.

The Shape of Air

The Shape of Air

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2013, all rights reserved.

Watercolor on Arches, 14 x 10"

$350 framed

Bean Guardian

Bean Guardian

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Watercolor on Arches, 11 x 8"

$500 framed

 

No Snails?

No Snails?

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  Photo by Jerry Mathiason.   

Watercolor & colored pencil on Arches, 8 x 14"

SOLD

Equation

Equation

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  

Watercolor on Arches

SOLD

Stand Here, and Watch

Stand Here, and Watch

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Watercolor on Arches, 10 x 17"

$800 framed

Atlantic Puffin Egg #1

Atlantic Puffin Egg #1

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2014, all rights reserved.  

Watercolor on Arches, 5 x 7"

$85 framed

Egg Series

Several years ago, I did a drawing exercise:  Every day I drew an egg.  I’d change the position, the lighting, the medium I used, and eventually I accumulated well over 100 egg sketches, which I keep in an old lunchbox.  At first I drew chicken eggs from the fridge, but at one point we had to take a trip out of town.  I couldn’t give up my daily egg sketch, but even hardboiled eggs wouldn’t have survived the trip.  So I poked around online, and discovered that it’s possible to get replicas of wild birds’s eggs.  (The real ones are federally protected, in case you’re wondering.)  I bought a Great Blue Heron egg replica, hand stitched a little case for it, and it became my traveling egg.  Of course, I couldn’t stop there.  More replica eggs followed, and egg reference books, and visits to Bell Museum.  It’s very easy to get hooked on eggs.  I find them to be lovely, evocative painting subjects.  They aren’t always what they seem to be.  Eggs are simultaneously extremely strong and easily broken, and they hold secrets.  They are self-contained, infinitely variable, and hide quite cleverly in plain sight.

Common Raven Egg

Common Raven Egg

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2014, all rights reserved.  

Watercolor on Arches, 5 x 7"

SOLD

Egg Series

Several years ago, I did a drawing exercise:  Every day I drew an egg.  I’d change the position, the lighting, the medium I used, and eventually I accumulated well over 100 egg sketches, which I keep in an old lunchbox.  At first I drew chicken eggs from the fridge, but at one point we had to take a trip out of town.  I couldn’t give up my daily egg sketch, but even hardboiled eggs wouldn’t have survived the trip.  So I poked around online, and discovered that it’s possible to get replicas of wild birds’s eggs.  (The real ones are federally protected, in case you’re wondering.)  I bought a Great Blue Heron egg replica, hand stitched a little case for it, and it became my traveling egg.  Of course, I couldn’t stop there.  More replica eggs followed, and egg reference books, and visits to Bell Museum.  It’s very easy to get hooked on eggs.  I find them to be lovely, evocative painting subjects.  They aren’t always what they seem to be.  Eggs are simultaneously extremely strong and easily broken, and they hold secrets.  They are self-contained, infinitely variable, and hide quite cleverly in plain sight.

Jackdaw Egg

Jackdaw Egg

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2014, all rights reserved.  

Watercolor on Arches, 5 x 7"

SOLD

Egg Series

Several years ago, I did a drawing exercise:  Every day I drew an egg.  I’d change the position, the lighting, the medium I used, and eventually I accumulated well over 100 egg sketches, which I keep in an old lunchbox.  At first I drew chicken eggs from the fridge, but at one point we had to take a trip out of town.  I couldn’t give up my daily egg sketch, but even hardboiled eggs wouldn’t have survived the trip.  So I poked around online, and discovered that it’s possible to get replicas of wild birds’s eggs.  (The real ones are federally protected, in case you’re wondering.)  I bought a Great Blue Heron egg replica, hand stitched a little case for it, and it became my traveling egg.  Of course, I couldn’t stop there.  More replica eggs followed, and egg reference books, and visits to Bell Museum.  It’s very easy to get hooked on eggs.  I find them to be lovely, evocative painting subjects.  They aren’t always what they seem to be.  Eggs are simultaneously extremely strong and easily broken, and they hold secrets.  They are self-contained, infinitely variable, and hide quite cleverly in plain sight.

Red-Tailed Hawk Egg #2

Red-Tailed Hawk Egg #2

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2014, all rights reserved.  

Watercolor on Arches, 5 x 7"

SOLD

Egg Series

Several years ago, I did a drawing exercise:  Every day I drew an egg.  I’d change the position, the lighting, the medium I used, and eventually I accumulated well over 100 egg sketches, which I keep in an old lunchbox.  At first I drew chicken eggs from the fridge, but at one point we had to take a trip out of town.  I couldn’t give up my daily egg sketch, but even hardboiled eggs wouldn’t have survived the trip.  So I poked around online, and discovered that it’s possible to get replicas of wild birds’s eggs.  (The real ones are federally protected, in case you’re wondering.)  I bought a Great Blue Heron egg replica, hand stitched a little case for it, and it became my traveling egg.  Of course, I couldn’t stop there.  More replica eggs followed, and egg reference books, and visits to Bell Museum.  It’s very easy to get hooked on eggs.  I find them to be lovely, evocative painting subjects.  They aren’t always what they seem to be.  Eggs are simultaneously extremely strong and easily broken, and they hold secrets.  They are self-contained, infinitely variable, and hide quite cleverly in plain sight.

Paradise Crow Egg #1

Paradise Crow Egg #1

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2014, all rights reserved.  

Watercolor on Arches, 5 x 7"

$85 framed

Egg Series

Several years ago, I did a drawing exercise:  Every day I drew an egg.  I’d change the position, the lighting, the medium I used, and eventually I accumulated well over 100 egg sketches, which I keep in an old lunchbox.  At first I drew chicken eggs from the fridge, but at one point we had to take a trip out of town.  I couldn’t give up my daily egg sketch, but even hardboiled eggs wouldn’t have survived the trip.  So I poked around online, and discovered that it’s possible to get replicas of wild birds’s eggs.  (The real ones are federally protected, in case you’re wondering.)  I bought a Great Blue Heron egg replica, hand stitched a little case for it, and it became my traveling egg.  Of course, I couldn’t stop there.  More replica eggs followed, and egg reference books, and visits to Bell Museum.  It’s very easy to get hooked on eggs.  I find them to be lovely, evocative painting subjects.  They aren’t always what they seem to be.  Eggs are simultaneously extremely strong and easily broken, and they hold secrets.  They are self-contained, infinitely variable, and hide quite cleverly in plain sight.

Turkey Vulture Egg #1

Turkey Vulture Egg #1

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2014, all rights reserved.  

Watercolor on Arches, 5 x 7"

SOLD

Egg Series

Several years ago, I did a drawing exercise:  Every day I drew an egg.  I’d change the position, the lighting, the medium I used, and eventually I accumulated well over 100 egg sketches, which I keep in an old lunchbox.  At first I drew chicken eggs from the fridge, but at one point we had to take a trip out of town.  I couldn’t give up my daily egg sketch, but even hardboiled eggs wouldn’t have survived the trip.  So I poked around online, and discovered that it’s possible to get replicas of wild birds’s eggs.  (The real ones are federally protected, in case you’re wondering.)  I bought a Great Blue Heron egg replica, hand stitched a little case for it, and it became my traveling egg.  Of course, I couldn’t stop there.  More replica eggs followed, and egg reference books, and visits to Bell Museum.  It’s very easy to get hooked on eggs.  I find them to be lovely, evocative painting subjects.  They aren’t always what they seem to be.  Eggs are simultaneously extremely strong and easily broken, and they hold secrets.  They are self-contained, infinitely variable, and hide quite cleverly in plain sight.

Sacred Ibis Egg #1

Sacred Ibis Egg #1

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2014, all rights reserved.  

Watercolor on Arches, 5 x 7"

$85 framed

Egg Series

Several years ago, I did a drawing exercise:  Every day I drew an egg.  I’d change the position, the lighting, the medium I used, and eventually I accumulated well over 100 egg sketches, which I keep in an old lunchbox.  At first I drew chicken eggs from the fridge, but at one point we had to take a trip out of town.  I couldn’t give up my daily egg sketch, but even hardboiled eggs wouldn’t have survived the trip.  So I poked around online, and discovered that it’s possible to get replicas of wild birds’s eggs.  (The real ones are federally protected, in case you’re wondering.)  I bought a Great Blue Heron egg replica, hand stitched a little case for it, and it became my traveling egg.  Of course, I couldn’t stop there.  More replica eggs followed, and egg reference books, and visits to Bell Museum.  It’s very easy to get hooked on eggs.  I find them to be lovely, evocative painting subjects.  They aren’t always what they seem to be.  Eggs are simultaneously extremely strong and easily broken, and they hold secrets.  They are self-contained, infinitely variable, and hide quite cleverly in plain sight.

Common Murre Egg #1

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2014, all rights reserved.  

Watercolor on Arches, 5 x 7"

$85 framed

Egg Series

Several years ago, I did a drawing exercise:  Every day I drew an egg.  I’d change the position, the lighting, the medium I used, and eventually I accumulated well over 100 egg sketches, which I keep in an old lunchbox.  At first I drew chicken eggs from the fridge, but at one point we had to take a trip out of town.  I couldn’t give up my daily egg sketch, but even hardboiled eggs wouldn’t have survived the trip.  So I poked around online, and discovered that it’s possible to get replicas of wild birds’s eggs.  (The real ones are federally protected, in case you’re wondering.)  I bought a Great Blue Heron egg replica, hand stitched a little case for it, and it became my traveling egg.  Of course, I couldn’t stop there.  More replica eggs followed, and egg reference books, and visits to Bell Museum.  It’s very easy to get hooked on eggs.  I find them to be lovely, evocative painting subjects.  They aren’t always what they seem to be.  Eggs are simultaneously extremely strong and easily broken, and they hold secrets.  They are self-contained, infinitely variable, and hide quite cleverly in plain sight.

Owl Eggs, Day

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Watercolor on Arches, 10.5 x 7.75"

$500 framed

Egg Series

Several years ago, I did a drawing exercise:  Every day I drew an egg.  I’d change the position, the lighting, the medium I used, and eventually I accumulated well over 100 egg sketches, which I keep in an old lunchbox.  At first I drew chicken eggs from the fridge, but at one point we had to take a trip out of town.  I couldn’t give up my daily egg sketch, but even hardboiled eggs wouldn’t have survived the trip.  So I poked around online, and discovered that it’s possible to get replicas of wild birds’s eggs.  (The real ones are federally protected, in case you’re wondering.)  I bought a Great Blue Heron egg replica, hand stitched a little case for it, and it became my traveling egg.  Of course, I couldn’t stop there.  More replica eggs followed, and egg reference books, and visits to Bell Museum.  It’s very easy to get hooked on eggs.  I find them to be lovely, evocative painting subjects.  They aren’t always what they seem to be.  Eggs are simultaneously extremely strong and easily broken, and they hold secrets.  They are self-contained, infinitely variable, and hide quite cleverly in plain sight.

Wishing Moon

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved. Photo by Jerry Mathiason.   

Watercolor & colored pencil on Arches, 8 x 10"

$600 framed

Protection Series

Keeping oneself safe from harm is critical to all living beings. Plants and animals have all sorts of amazing adaptations for self-protection, from poisonous venoms to dramatic coloration that wards off predators. As endlessly creative human beings, we often go beyond what’s necessary (nuclear bombs) or craft odd, illusory forms of protection such as tinfoil hats, masks, blindfolds, conjuring and magical thinking. We use these tools to create a sense of safety, to find a way out of a tight space, or to frighten off someone else who might pose a threat. Where and how do we feel safe, and is that safety real or imagined?

Snow Sky

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Watercolor on Arches, 10 x 13"

$800 framed

Snow Sky

There’s something quite satisfying about painting one’s own studio space.  My studio is a comfortable, calming place where focus comes easily, and like many painters before me, I want to memorialize its quirks.  I particularly love the old windows in the Northrup King Building, and one day something about the combination of the windowpanes, the power lines and that white, snow-is-coming sky really struck me.  The Raven seems to like it, too. 

Why Did You Invite Me?

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Watercolor on Arches, 19.5 x 11.5"

SOLD

Limited edition prints $125

Why Did You Invite Me?

In Aesop’s fable, the fox and the crane are the ultimate ”frenemies,” enemies who keep trying to be friends.  The fox invites the crane over for dinner, and serves soup in a shallow bowl from which the crane can’t drink.  The crane returns the favor by inviting the fox to dine on soup served in a tall, skinny vase.  

I chose to paint the moment when these two beautiful creatures, the Sandhill Crane and the Red Fox (both can be spotted here in Minnesota), are staring each other down, each one wondering why he or she is bothering with the other and yet for some reason neither one wants to simply walk away.  Bad friendships are a universal and mysterious thing, and obviously something that’s as old as Aesop.  Why do we tolerate them?

 

No Regrets

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2014, all rights reserved.

Watercolor on Arches, 14 x 10"

$800 framed

Osprey Variations

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2013, all rights reserved.  

Watercolor on Arches, 11 x 8.5"

SOLD

Egg Series

Several years ago, I did a drawing exercise:  Every day I drew an egg.  I’d change the position, the lighting, the medium I used, and eventually I accumulated well over 100 egg sketches, which I keep in an old lunchbox.  At first I drew chicken eggs from the fridge, but at one point we had to take a trip out of town.  I couldn’t give up my daily egg sketch, but even hardboiled eggs wouldn’t have survived the trip.  So I poked around online, and discovered that it’s possible to get replicas of wild birds’s eggs.  (The real ones are federally protected, in case you’re wondering.)  I bought a Great Blue Heron egg replica, hand stitched a little case for it, and it became my traveling egg.  Of course, I couldn’t stop there.  More replica eggs followed, and egg reference books, and visits to Bell Museum.  It’s very easy to get hooked on eggs.  I find them to be lovely, evocative painting subjects.  They aren’t always what they seem to be.  Eggs are simultaneously extremely strong and easily broken, and they hold secrets.  They are self-contained, infinitely variable, and hide quite cleverly in plain sight.

 

Dinner Plans

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  Photo by Jerry Mathiason. 

Watercolor & colored pencil on Arches, 12 x 20"

$1500 framed

Limited edition prints $125

Fishing Lure Series

I love lures. They’re fascinating objects which have a purpose, yet they often have a touch of whimsy and personality in their designs. Even though I’ve never done anything more advanced than bobber fishing for panfish, I have a tackle box full of big, elaborate lures. I just bought them because I liked them. 

Recently, it occurred to me that lures would be interesting to paint, so I dragged the tackle box out of the garage and rummaged through it. Such treasures:  shiny, perfect lures I’d bought and, of course, never used next to old, beat-up ones that had belonged to my father. In this series, I’ve combined fishing lures with grocery lists and other found papers to evoke thoughts about fishing and why it’s such a big part of the culture here in Minnesota. 

If you have a special lure, use the Contact page to get in touch with me about commissioning a painting. There's no better way to preserve your greatest fishing stories than a one-of-a-kind work of art.  

The 98th Try Is the Charm

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved. Photo by Jerry Mathiason.  

Watercolor & colored pencil on Arches, 12 x 20"

$1500 framed

Limited edition prints $125

Fishing Lure Series

I love lures. They’re fascinating objects which have a purpose, yet they often have a touch of whimsy and personality in their designs. Even though I’ve never done anything more advanced than bobber fishing for panfish, I have a tackle box full of big, elaborate lures. I just bought them because I liked them. 

Recently, it occurred to me that lures would be interesting to paint, so I dragged the tackle box out of the garage and rummaged through it. Such treasures:  shiny, perfect lures I’d bought and, of course, never used next to old, beat-up ones that had belonged to my father. In this series, I’ve combined fishing lures with grocery lists and other found papers to evoke thoughts about fishing and why it’s such a big part of the culture here in Minnesota.   

If you have a special lure, use the Contact page to get in touch with me about commissioning a painting. There's no better way to preserve your greatest fishing stories than a one-of-a-kind work of art.

Long Weekend

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved. Photo by Jerry Mathiason. 

Watercolor & colored pencil on Arches, 9 x 12"

$900 framed

Fishing Lure Series

I love lures. They’re fascinating objects which have a purpose, yet they often have a touch of whimsy and personality in their designs. Even though I’ve never done anything more advanced than bobber fishing for panfish, I have a tackle box full of big, elaborate lures. I just bought them because I liked them. 

Recently, it occurred to me that lures would be interesting to paint, so I dragged the tackle box out of the garage and rummaged through it. Such treasures:  shiny, perfect lures I’d bought and, of course, never used next to old, beat-up ones that had belonged to my father. In this series, I’ve combined fishing lures with grocery lists and other found papers to evoke thoughts about fishing and why it’s such a big part of the culture here in Minnesota.   

If you have a special lure, use the Contact page to get in touch with me about commissioning a painting. There's no better way to preserve your greatest fishing stories than a one-of-a-kind work of art.

Working Hard

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2016, all rights reserved.

Watercolor & colored pencil on Arches, 9 x 12"

$900 framed

Limited edition prints $125

Fishing Lure Series

I love lures. They’re fascinating objects which have a purpose, yet they often have a touch of whimsy and personality in their designs. Even though I’ve never done anything more advanced than bobber fishing for panfish, I have a tackle box full of big, elaborate lures. I just bought them because I liked them. 

Recently, it occurred to me that lures would be interesting to paint, so I dragged the tackle box out of the garage and rummaged through it. Such treasures:  shiny, perfect lures I’d bought and, of course, never used next to old, beat-up ones that had belonged to my father. In this series, I’ve combined fishing lures with grocery lists and other found papers to evoke thoughts about fishing and why it’s such a big part of the culture here in Minnesota.   

If you have a special lure, use the Contact page to get in touch with me about commissioning a painting. There's no better way to preserve your greatest fishing stories than a one-of-a-kind work of art.

The Shape of Air

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2013, all rights reserved.

Watercolor on Arches, 14 x 10"

$350 framed

Bean Guardian

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Watercolor on Arches, 11 x 8"

$500 framed

 

No Snails?

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  Photo by Jerry Mathiason.   

Watercolor & colored pencil on Arches, 8 x 14"

SOLD

Equation

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  

Watercolor on Arches

SOLD

Stand Here, and Watch

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Watercolor on Arches, 10 x 17"

$800 framed

Atlantic Puffin Egg #1

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2014, all rights reserved.  

Watercolor on Arches, 5 x 7"

$85 framed

Egg Series

Several years ago, I did a drawing exercise:  Every day I drew an egg.  I’d change the position, the lighting, the medium I used, and eventually I accumulated well over 100 egg sketches, which I keep in an old lunchbox.  At first I drew chicken eggs from the fridge, but at one point we had to take a trip out of town.  I couldn’t give up my daily egg sketch, but even hardboiled eggs wouldn’t have survived the trip.  So I poked around online, and discovered that it’s possible to get replicas of wild birds’s eggs.  (The real ones are federally protected, in case you’re wondering.)  I bought a Great Blue Heron egg replica, hand stitched a little case for it, and it became my traveling egg.  Of course, I couldn’t stop there.  More replica eggs followed, and egg reference books, and visits to Bell Museum.  It’s very easy to get hooked on eggs.  I find them to be lovely, evocative painting subjects.  They aren’t always what they seem to be.  Eggs are simultaneously extremely strong and easily broken, and they hold secrets.  They are self-contained, infinitely variable, and hide quite cleverly in plain sight.

Common Raven Egg

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2014, all rights reserved.  

Watercolor on Arches, 5 x 7"

SOLD

Egg Series

Several years ago, I did a drawing exercise:  Every day I drew an egg.  I’d change the position, the lighting, the medium I used, and eventually I accumulated well over 100 egg sketches, which I keep in an old lunchbox.  At first I drew chicken eggs from the fridge, but at one point we had to take a trip out of town.  I couldn’t give up my daily egg sketch, but even hardboiled eggs wouldn’t have survived the trip.  So I poked around online, and discovered that it’s possible to get replicas of wild birds’s eggs.  (The real ones are federally protected, in case you’re wondering.)  I bought a Great Blue Heron egg replica, hand stitched a little case for it, and it became my traveling egg.  Of course, I couldn’t stop there.  More replica eggs followed, and egg reference books, and visits to Bell Museum.  It’s very easy to get hooked on eggs.  I find them to be lovely, evocative painting subjects.  They aren’t always what they seem to be.  Eggs are simultaneously extremely strong and easily broken, and they hold secrets.  They are self-contained, infinitely variable, and hide quite cleverly in plain sight.

Jackdaw Egg

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2014, all rights reserved.  

Watercolor on Arches, 5 x 7"

SOLD

Egg Series

Several years ago, I did a drawing exercise:  Every day I drew an egg.  I’d change the position, the lighting, the medium I used, and eventually I accumulated well over 100 egg sketches, which I keep in an old lunchbox.  At first I drew chicken eggs from the fridge, but at one point we had to take a trip out of town.  I couldn’t give up my daily egg sketch, but even hardboiled eggs wouldn’t have survived the trip.  So I poked around online, and discovered that it’s possible to get replicas of wild birds’s eggs.  (The real ones are federally protected, in case you’re wondering.)  I bought a Great Blue Heron egg replica, hand stitched a little case for it, and it became my traveling egg.  Of course, I couldn’t stop there.  More replica eggs followed, and egg reference books, and visits to Bell Museum.  It’s very easy to get hooked on eggs.  I find them to be lovely, evocative painting subjects.  They aren’t always what they seem to be.  Eggs are simultaneously extremely strong and easily broken, and they hold secrets.  They are self-contained, infinitely variable, and hide quite cleverly in plain sight.

Red-Tailed Hawk Egg #2

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2014, all rights reserved.  

Watercolor on Arches, 5 x 7"

SOLD

Egg Series

Several years ago, I did a drawing exercise:  Every day I drew an egg.  I’d change the position, the lighting, the medium I used, and eventually I accumulated well over 100 egg sketches, which I keep in an old lunchbox.  At first I drew chicken eggs from the fridge, but at one point we had to take a trip out of town.  I couldn’t give up my daily egg sketch, but even hardboiled eggs wouldn’t have survived the trip.  So I poked around online, and discovered that it’s possible to get replicas of wild birds’s eggs.  (The real ones are federally protected, in case you’re wondering.)  I bought a Great Blue Heron egg replica, hand stitched a little case for it, and it became my traveling egg.  Of course, I couldn’t stop there.  More replica eggs followed, and egg reference books, and visits to Bell Museum.  It’s very easy to get hooked on eggs.  I find them to be lovely, evocative painting subjects.  They aren’t always what they seem to be.  Eggs are simultaneously extremely strong and easily broken, and they hold secrets.  They are self-contained, infinitely variable, and hide quite cleverly in plain sight.

Paradise Crow Egg #1

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2014, all rights reserved.  

Watercolor on Arches, 5 x 7"

$85 framed

Egg Series

Several years ago, I did a drawing exercise:  Every day I drew an egg.  I’d change the position, the lighting, the medium I used, and eventually I accumulated well over 100 egg sketches, which I keep in an old lunchbox.  At first I drew chicken eggs from the fridge, but at one point we had to take a trip out of town.  I couldn’t give up my daily egg sketch, but even hardboiled eggs wouldn’t have survived the trip.  So I poked around online, and discovered that it’s possible to get replicas of wild birds’s eggs.  (The real ones are federally protected, in case you’re wondering.)  I bought a Great Blue Heron egg replica, hand stitched a little case for it, and it became my traveling egg.  Of course, I couldn’t stop there.  More replica eggs followed, and egg reference books, and visits to Bell Museum.  It’s very easy to get hooked on eggs.  I find them to be lovely, evocative painting subjects.  They aren’t always what they seem to be.  Eggs are simultaneously extremely strong and easily broken, and they hold secrets.  They are self-contained, infinitely variable, and hide quite cleverly in plain sight.

Turkey Vulture Egg #1

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2014, all rights reserved.  

Watercolor on Arches, 5 x 7"

SOLD

Egg Series

Several years ago, I did a drawing exercise:  Every day I drew an egg.  I’d change the position, the lighting, the medium I used, and eventually I accumulated well over 100 egg sketches, which I keep in an old lunchbox.  At first I drew chicken eggs from the fridge, but at one point we had to take a trip out of town.  I couldn’t give up my daily egg sketch, but even hardboiled eggs wouldn’t have survived the trip.  So I poked around online, and discovered that it’s possible to get replicas of wild birds’s eggs.  (The real ones are federally protected, in case you’re wondering.)  I bought a Great Blue Heron egg replica, hand stitched a little case for it, and it became my traveling egg.  Of course, I couldn’t stop there.  More replica eggs followed, and egg reference books, and visits to Bell Museum.  It’s very easy to get hooked on eggs.  I find them to be lovely, evocative painting subjects.  They aren’t always what they seem to be.  Eggs are simultaneously extremely strong and easily broken, and they hold secrets.  They are self-contained, infinitely variable, and hide quite cleverly in plain sight.

Sacred Ibis Egg #1

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2014, all rights reserved.  

Watercolor on Arches, 5 x 7"

$85 framed

Egg Series

Several years ago, I did a drawing exercise:  Every day I drew an egg.  I’d change the position, the lighting, the medium I used, and eventually I accumulated well over 100 egg sketches, which I keep in an old lunchbox.  At first I drew chicken eggs from the fridge, but at one point we had to take a trip out of town.  I couldn’t give up my daily egg sketch, but even hardboiled eggs wouldn’t have survived the trip.  So I poked around online, and discovered that it’s possible to get replicas of wild birds’s eggs.  (The real ones are federally protected, in case you’re wondering.)  I bought a Great Blue Heron egg replica, hand stitched a little case for it, and it became my traveling egg.  Of course, I couldn’t stop there.  More replica eggs followed, and egg reference books, and visits to Bell Museum.  It’s very easy to get hooked on eggs.  I find them to be lovely, evocative painting subjects.  They aren’t always what they seem to be.  Eggs are simultaneously extremely strong and easily broken, and they hold secrets.  They are self-contained, infinitely variable, and hide quite cleverly in plain sight.

Common Murre Egg #1
Owl Eggs, Day
Wishing Moon
Snow Sky
Why Did You Invite Me?
No Regrets
Osprey Variations
Dinner Plans
The 98th Try Is the Charm
Long Weekend
Working Hard
The Shape of Air
Bean Guardian
No Snails?
Equation
Stand Here, and Watch
Atlantic Puffin Egg #1
Common Raven Egg
Jackdaw Egg
Red-Tailed Hawk Egg #2
Paradise Crow Egg #1
Turkey Vulture Egg #1
Sacred Ibis Egg #1