Natural History Arts
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Gifts #1

Gifts #1

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2016, all rights reserved. Photo by Jerry Mathiason.  

Graphite & watercolor on vintage ledger paper, 13 x 15"

$600 framed

Just One Piece sm.jpg
Conundrum #2

Conundrum #2

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2017, all rights reserved. Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Graphite on paper, 22 x 30"

$1200 framed

Advice From the Enchanted Forest, Part Two

Advice From the Enchanted Forest, Part Two

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2017, all rights reserved. Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Graphite on paper, 11.5 x 8.5"

$450 framed

Courageous

Courageous

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2017, all rights reserved.

Colored pencil on Mylar, 10 x 7.5"

$400 framed

Keeping oneself safe from harm is critical to all living beings. Plants and animals have all sorts of amazing adaptations for self-protection, from poisonous venoms to dramatic coloration that wards off predators. As endlessly creative human beings, we often go beyond what’s necessary (nuclear bombs) or craft odd, illusory forms of protection such as tinfoil hats, masks, blindfolds, conjuring and magical thinking. We use these tools to create a sense of safety, to find a way out of a tight space, or to frighten off someone else who might pose a threat. Where and how do we feel safe, and is that safety real or imagined?

Preserved

Preserved

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2017, all rights reserved. Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Colored pencil on vellum, 11.5 x 8"

SOLD

You Can't See Me

You Can't See Me

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2017, all rights reserved.

Colored pencil on Terraskin, 7 x 5"

$200 framed

 

Keeping oneself safe from harm is critical to all living beings. Plants and animals have all sorts of amazing adaptations for self-protection, from poisonous venoms to dramatic coloration that wards off predators. As endlessly creative human beings, we often go beyond what’s necessary (nuclear bombs) or craft odd, illusory forms of protection such as tinfoil hats, masks, blindfolds, conjuring and magical thinking. We use these tools to create a sense of safety, to find a way out of a tight space, or to frighten off someone else who might pose a threat. Where and how do we feel safe, and is that safety real or imagined?

Advice From the Enchanted Forest, Part One

Advice From the Enchanted Forest, Part One

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2017, all rights reserved. Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Graphite on paper, 14 x 11"

$500 framed

Early Indications of a Conspiracy, Part Three

Early Indications of a Conspiracy, Part Three

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2016, all rights reserved. Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Charcoal & pastel on paper, 40 x 30"

$2500 unframed

Early Indications of a Conspiracy, Part One

Early Indications of a Conspiracy, Part One

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2016, all rights reserved. Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Charcoal & pastel on paper, 40 x 30"

$2500 unframed

Early Indications of a Conspiracy, Part Two

Early Indications of a Conspiracy, Part Two

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2016, all rights reserved. Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Charcoal & pastel on paper, 40 x 30"

$2500 unframed

Popcorn for Mrs. Leary

Popcorn for Mrs. Leary

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2016, all rights reserved.  

Graphite & colored pencil on vintage ledger paper, 9.5 x 7.75"

$400 framed

Conundrum #1

Conundrum #1

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2016, all rights reserved. Photo by Jerry Mathiason.  

Graphite on paper, 19.5 x 27"

$900 unframed

Not Home

Not Home

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Graphite, charcoal, carbon & pastel on Arnhem

22 x 14"

$1200 framed

This drawing was featured in Minnesota Monthly Magazine as part of its article, "Best Art of 2016."

 

Surveillance Series

I’ve been thinking about how much we’re all under surveillance these days. There are cameras in so many places that much of the time we don’t even notice them anymore. Corporations keep track of what we buy and observe what we look at online. There are countless security cameras everywhere, which can be both good and bad. On the generally less sinister side of things, ordinary people are curious about other ordinary people and pay attention to what they do. Your neighbor probably knows when you’ve gotten new drapes for the windows; the mail carrier knows your politics; and the recycling collector surely notices when you’ve just thrown out a box for a brand new computer. The more you think about various forms of surveillance, the more you realize how very deeply entrenched in our lives they are. 

It also occurred to me that we’re under observation by other living creatures, too. Birds and animals keep close eyes on us for their own safety and well-being. (At our house, they sit in the pine trees and watch for Food Guy to come and refill the feeders, and then run out to chow down the moment he’s back in the house). Are they watching us for other, mysterious reasons as well? Since we don’t understand their languages, we have no way of knowing. I love watching birds from my windows — but what are they thinking as they watch me? All living creatures must protect themselves from harm to survive, and that includes keeping an eye on the neighbors.

Don't Look

Don't Look

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Graphite on Canson vellum, 9.75 x 9.75"

$450 framed

Protection Series

Keeping oneself safe from harm is critical to all living beings. Plants and animals have all sorts of amazing adaptations for self-protection, from poisonous venoms to dramatic coloration that wards off predators. As endlessly creative human beings, we often go beyond what’s necessary (nuclear bombs) or craft odd, illusory forms of protection such as tinfoil hats, masks, blindfolds, conjuring and magical thinking. We use these tools to create a sense of safety, to find a way out of a tight space, or to frighten off someone else who might pose a threat. Where and how do we feel safe, and is that safety real or imagined?

Disguised

Disguised

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2017, all rights reserved. Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Graphite on vellum, 9.5 x 9.5"

$450 framed

Keeping oneself safe from harm is critical to all living beings. Plants and animals have all sorts of amazing adaptations for self-protection, from poisonous venoms to dramatic coloration that wards off predators. As endlessly creative human beings, we often go beyond what’s necessary (nuclear bombs) or craft odd, illusory forms of protection such as tinfoil hats, masks, blindfolds, conjuring and magical thinking. We use these tools to create a sense of safety, to find a way out of a tight space, or to frighten off someone else who might pose a threat. Where and how do we feel safe, and is that safety real or imagined?

You Won't Know

You Won't Know

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Graphite on Canson vellum, 10.75 x 9.75"

$450 framed

Protection Series

Keeping oneself safe from harm is critical to all living beings. Plants and animals have all sorts of amazing adaptations for self-protection, from poisonous venoms to dramatic coloration that wards off predators. As endlessly creative human beings, we often go beyond what’s necessary (nuclear bombs) or craft odd, illusory forms of protection such as tinfoil hats, masks, blindfolds, conjuring and magical thinking. We use these tools to create a sense of safety, to find a way out of a tight space, or to frighten off someone else who might pose a threat. Where and how do we feel safe, and is that safety real or imagined?

In Which We Narrowly Escape Being Overheard

In Which We Narrowly Escape Being Overheard

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2016, all rights reserved.

Graphite on paper, 22 x 30"

SOLD

Shrimp Lo Mein

Shrimp Lo Mein

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  Photo by Jerry Mathiason. 

Charcoal & graphite on Somerset, 15 x 22"

$1200 framed

Surveillance Series

I’ve been thinking about how much we’re all under surveillance these days. There are cameras in so many places that much of the time we don’t even notice them anymore. Corporations keep track of what we buy and observe what we look at online. There are countless security cameras everywhere, which can be both good and bad. On the generally less sinister side of things, ordinary people are curious about other ordinary people and pay attention to what they do. Your neighbor probably knows when you’ve gotten new drapes for the windows; the mail carrier knows your politics; and the recycling collector surely notices when you’ve just thrown out a box for a brand new computer. The more you think about various forms of surveillance, the more you realize how very deeply entrenched in our lives they are. 

It also occurred to me that we’re under observation by other living creatures, too. Birds and animals keep close eyes on us for their own safety and well-being. (At our house, they sit in the pine trees and watch for Food Guy to come and refill the feeders, and then run out to chow down the moment he’s back in the house). Are they watching us for other, mysterious reasons as well? Since we don’t understand their languages, we have no way of knowing. I love watching birds from my windows — but what are they thinking as they watch me? All living creatures must protect themselves from harm to survive, and that includes keeping an eye on the neighbors.

 

I Know What I Saw (Ghost #1)

I Know What I Saw (Ghost #1)

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2016, all rights reserved.

Cotton embroidery floss on Dura-lar, approx. 72 x 20"

$5000

A Small Botheration (Wee Ghost #1)

A Small Botheration (Wee Ghost #1)

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2016, all rights reserved.

Cotton embroidery floss on Dura-lar, 12 x 9"

$400

Scattered

Scattered

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  

Graphite on vintage ledger paper, 5 x 4"

SOLD

Red-Tailed Hawk Variations

Red-Tailed Hawk Variations

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2014, all rights reserved.

Graphite on vintage ledger paper, 11 x 9"

SOLD

Ledger Paper Series

I enjoy working with found papers, including these pages from an accounting ledger that was serious business to someone in the 1970’s.  But how much does such a thing really matter within the larger context of our world?  Does it retain meaning once the company and people who worked there are gone?  Humans invest great importance in documents, yet they often have little regard for our irreplaceable natural world and feel free to scatter it with detritus and to destroy it in subtle and not-so-subtle ways.

In this series of drawings, I’ve juxtaposed often-unobserved creatures and natural objects with used ledger pages and text transcribed from found grocery lists.  These outdated documents form marks to which we are immediately drawn, and which offer enigmatic text and unsolvable puzzles.

No, Three

No, Three

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2016, all rights reserved. 

Graphite on antique ledger paper, 11 x 8.5"

$400 framed

 

This drawing was made on 100-year-old paper.

Girls' Night Out

Girls' Night Out

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.

Graphite on vintage ledger paper, 9.25 x 11"

$400 framed

Balanced Diet

Balanced Diet

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  

Graphite & gouache on vintage ledger paper, 5 x 4"

$85 in hand-labeled glass jar

Grocery List Series

The grocery list obsession arises in part out of my love of food and cooking; I’m fascinated by what other people put in their carts at the store.  I often try to memorize what folks in line are buying, if it’s interesting, to report on later at home.  “The woman in front of me had nothing but fifteen giant bottles of grape soda and three bags of frozen fries!”  It was a short step from that behavior to picking up abandoned lists from carts, the floor, the parking lot.  I don’t care if someone sees me diving for a list and thinks I’m nuts.  I love trying to figure out what menus people are planning based on their lists, and I enjoy the visual constructions, the handwriting, the scribbled out items, the organizational structure of each list.  The small mysteries are irresistible, and as a whole, my collection of lists offers a picture of one tiny slice of contemporary life in our city.

Two Tube Worms and a Rice Noodle

Two Tube Worms and a Rice Noodle

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2014, all rights reserved. 

Graphite on vintage ledger paper, 11 x 8.25"

$400 framed

Nest #1: Black Vulture

Nest #1: Black Vulture

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2014, all rights reserved. 

Graphite on vintage ledger paper, 11 x 9.25"

$400 framed

Osprey Eggs with Erased List

Osprey Eggs with Erased List

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2014, all rights reserved.

Graphite on vintage ledger paper, 11 x 9"

$400 framed

Ledger Paper Series

I enjoy working with found papers, including these pages from an accounting ledger that was serious business to someone in the 1970’s.  But how much does such a thing really matter within the larger context of our world?  Does it retain meaning once the company and people who worked there are gone?  Humans invest great importance in documents, yet they often have little regard for our irreplaceable natural world and feel free to scatter it with detritus and to destroy it in subtle and not-so-subtle ways.

In this series of drawings, I’ve juxtaposed often-unobserved creatures and natural objects with used ledger pages and text transcribed from found grocery lists.  These outdated documents form marks to which we are immediately drawn, and which offer enigmatic text and unsolvable puzzles.

The Science of the Bat's Head Root

The Science of the Bat's Head Root

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2014, all rights reserved. 

Graphite on vintage ledger paper, 12 x 9.25"

$400 framed

You First

You First

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  Photo by Jerry Mathiason. 

Charcoal on grey Strathmore, 7 x 18"

SOLD

Curiosity Cabinet #1:  Three Eggs & a Cootie Catcher

Curiosity Cabinet #1: Three Eggs & a Cootie Catcher

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2014, all rights reserved.

Graphite on Canson vellum, 11 x 14"

$600 framed

Curiosity Cabinet #1:  Three Eggs & a Cootie Catcher

Cabinets of curiosities were the first museums.  People organized collections of objects in actual cabinets, or in rooms devoted to the purpose:  natural objects, natural history fakes, archaeological finds, religious and historical relics, antiques and objets d’art.  Humans just love to collect stuff and organize it and look at it and show it off.

This drawing is about my fascination with what I refer to as personal museums, the small curiosity cabinets we construct in our homes with found objects, souvenirs and inherited treasures.  Even the most tidy and spartan people I know have at least one tiny collection of objects they couldn’t resist.  Being neither tidy nor spartan, I have lots of collections.  This particular one, however, exists only in the drawing.  It reflects my fascination with the elusive beauty of birds’ eggs, and also gives a nod to something that I found to be mysterious when I was growing up:  the cootie catcher.  All the popular girls had them, but I wasn’t privy to the secret of how to fold one.  The closest I got was taking a turn at having my fortune told.  It was ages before I discovered that cootie catchers are actually easy to make.  This was perhaps the first time I noticed the way that status often depends upon illusion and on the ability to make more of things than they actually are.

Against the Cold

Against the Cold

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2016, all rights reserved.

Graphite on bristol, 14.5 x 11.5"

$500 framed

Come Back Here With That

Come Back Here With That

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Graphite on Stillman & Birn Zeta, 11 x 27"

$11 00 framed

Come Back Here With That

I’m fascinated by bumblebees, so I took a class from the U’s Bee Squad and found out all sorts of interesting things.  Bumblebees are northern creatures.  They have thick hair and antifreeze in their blood, and can actually buzz around working in temperatures just below freezing.  We have 19 species of them in Minnesota, most of which are not easy to distinguish from each other (believe me, I tried).  Bumblebees are incredibly important pollinators.  In fact, they’re more efficient at pollinating certain plants than honeybees are.  You can thank bumblebees for blueberries, cranberries, squash and melons.  

Bumblebees are fun to draw.  I love the way they hang in the air like tiny, fuzzy zeppelins.  They’re smart, and most of the species here in our state are not aggressive — no need to run and scream when you see one.  To my mind, they naturally lend themselves to the creation of visual narratives, and easily become characters in small dramas of my own devising.  

The lone bee in this drawing is flying as fast as she can to get away from the others, who mean to steal her list.  Yes, this bee is female.  See the wide sections on on her back legs?  Pollen baskets.  Only the females have them.  I did learn something in that class even if I still can’t tell a Bombus pensylvanicus from a Bombus auricomus.

Western Meadowlark, Protected

Western Meadowlark, Protected

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  

Graphite on Terraskin, 3 x 2"

$65 in hand-labeled glass jar

Protection Series

Keeping oneself safe from harm is critical to all living beings. Plants and animals have all sorts of amazing adaptations for self-protection, from poisonous venoms to dramatic coloration that wards off predators. As endlessly creative human beings, we often go beyond what’s necessary (nuclear bombs) or craft odd, illusory forms of protection such as tinfoil hats, masks, blindfolds, conjuring and magical thinking. We use these tools to create a sense of safety, to find a way out of a tight space, or to frighten off someone else who might pose a threat. Where and how do we feel safe, and is that safety real or imagined?

Common Murre Variations

Common Murre Variations

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2014, all rights reserved.

Watercolor pencil & graphite on crumpled vintage ledger paper, 10 x 7.75"

SOLD

There She Is

There She Is

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2016, all rights reserved.

Charcoal on paper, 9 x 19.5"

$500 framed

Piping Plover, Protected

Piping Plover, Protected

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  

Graphite on Terraskin

2 x 3"

$65 in hand-labeled glass jar

Protection Series

Keeping oneself safe from harm is critical to all living beings. Plants and animals have all sorts of amazing adaptations for self-protection, from poisonous venoms to dramatic coloration that wards off predators. As endlessly creative human beings, we often go beyond what’s necessary (nuclear bombs) or craft odd, illusory forms of protection such as tinfoil hats, masks, blindfolds, conjuring and magical thinking. We use these tools to create a sense of safety, to find a way out of a tight space, or to frighten off someone else who might pose a threat. Where and how do we feel safe, and is that safety real or imagined?

 

Northern Cardinal, Protected

Northern Cardinal, Protected

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  

Graphite on Terraskin

2 x 3"

$65 in hand-labeled glass jar

Protection Series

Keeping oneself safe from harm is critical to all living beings. Plants and animals have all sorts of amazing adaptations for self-protection, from poisonous venoms to dramatic coloration that wards off predators. As endlessly creative human beings, we often go beyond what’s necessary (nuclear bombs) or craft odd, illusory forms of protection such as tinfoil hats, masks, blindfolds, conjuring and magical thinking. We use these tools to create a sense of safety, to find a way out of a tight space, or to frighten off someone else who might pose a threat. Where and how do we feel safe, and is that safety real or imagined?

We'll Come Back Later

We'll Come Back Later

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Charcoal on Lokta paper, 13 x 16.5"

SOLD

We’ll Come Back Later

Even friendly groups can form factions and suddenly become treacherous.  The raven skull provides refuge for this bumblebee as she figures out her next move.  The skull seems to make the other bees nervous — it’s good to have a friend you can trust.

 

Escape Plan

Escape Plan

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Graphite on Stillman & Birn Zeta, 15 x 11"

SOLD

Escape Plan

This grocery list was a gift from a friend, something she pocketed after taking her father grocery shopping one day.  (Thank you, Amy!)  I treasure it because of the marvelous variety of items, the number of different cereals, and of course the Wheaties tag line.  What would a 92 year old guy in an assisted living be doing with that much cereal, a compass and a shiny new haircut?  Thus this drawing of a raven with an escape plan was born.

No Dessert

No Dessert

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2014, all rights reserved.  Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Graphite on Stillman & Birn Zeta

$600 framed

Grocery List Series

The grocery list obsession arises in part out of my love of food and cooking; I’m fascinated by what other people put in their carts at the store.  I often try to memorize what folks in line are buying, if it’s interesting, to report on later at home.  “The woman in front of me had nothing but fifteen giant bottles of grape soda and three bags of frozen fries!”  It was a short step from that behavior to picking up abandoned lists from carts, the floor, the parking lot.  I don’t care if someone sees me diving for a list and thinks I’m nuts.  I love trying to figure out what menus people are planning based on their lists, and I enjoy the visual constructions, the handwriting, the scribbled out items, the organizational structure of each list.  The small mysteries are irresistible, and as a whole, my collection of lists offers a picture of one tiny slice of contemporary life in our city.

Crow and Raven Worry About Plaza Curve

Crow and Raven Worry About Plaza Curve

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.

White pencil on Stonehenge, 6.75 x 17"

$600 framed

Desert Power Struggle: Out of Blueberries

Desert Power Struggle: Out of Blueberries

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2014, all rights reserved.  Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Graphite on Stillman & Birn Zeta

$600 framed

Grocery List Series

The grocery list obsession arises in part out of my love of food and cooking; I’m fascinated by what other people put in their carts at the store.  I often try to memorize what folks in line are buying, if it’s interesting, to report on later at home.  “The woman in front of me had nothing but fifteen giant bottles of grape soda and three bags of frozen fries!”  It was a short step from that behavior to picking up abandoned lists from carts, the floor, the parking lot.  I don’t care if someone sees me diving for a list and thinks I’m nuts.  I love trying to figure out what menus people are planning based on their lists, and I enjoy the visual constructions, the handwriting, the scribbled out items, the organizational structure of each list.  The small mysteries are irresistible, and as a whole, my collection of lists offers a picture of one tiny slice of contemporary life in our city.

Black-Capped Chickadee, Protected

Black-Capped Chickadee, Protected

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  

Graphite on Terraskin, 3 x 2"

SOLD

Crow Skull

Crow Skull

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  

White pencil on Stonehenge, 2.75 x 4"

SOLD

Red-tailed Hawk Eggs with Erased List

Red-tailed Hawk Eggs with Erased List

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2014, all rights reserved. 

Graphite on vintage ledger paper

SOLD

Just One Piece

Just One Piece

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2017, all rights reserved. Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Graphite & watercolor on vintage ledger paper, 15 x 12.5"

$500 framed

Gifts #1

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2016, all rights reserved. Photo by Jerry Mathiason.  

Graphite & watercolor on vintage ledger paper, 13 x 15"

$600 framed

Conundrum #2

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2017, all rights reserved. Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Graphite on paper, 22 x 30"

$1200 framed

Advice From the Enchanted Forest, Part Two

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2017, all rights reserved. Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Graphite on paper, 11.5 x 8.5"

$450 framed

Courageous

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2017, all rights reserved.

Colored pencil on Mylar, 10 x 7.5"

$400 framed

Keeping oneself safe from harm is critical to all living beings. Plants and animals have all sorts of amazing adaptations for self-protection, from poisonous venoms to dramatic coloration that wards off predators. As endlessly creative human beings, we often go beyond what’s necessary (nuclear bombs) or craft odd, illusory forms of protection such as tinfoil hats, masks, blindfolds, conjuring and magical thinking. We use these tools to create a sense of safety, to find a way out of a tight space, or to frighten off someone else who might pose a threat. Where and how do we feel safe, and is that safety real or imagined?

Preserved

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2017, all rights reserved. Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Colored pencil on vellum, 11.5 x 8"

SOLD

You Can't See Me

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2017, all rights reserved.

Colored pencil on Terraskin, 7 x 5"

$200 framed

 

Keeping oneself safe from harm is critical to all living beings. Plants and animals have all sorts of amazing adaptations for self-protection, from poisonous venoms to dramatic coloration that wards off predators. As endlessly creative human beings, we often go beyond what’s necessary (nuclear bombs) or craft odd, illusory forms of protection such as tinfoil hats, masks, blindfolds, conjuring and magical thinking. We use these tools to create a sense of safety, to find a way out of a tight space, or to frighten off someone else who might pose a threat. Where and how do we feel safe, and is that safety real or imagined?

Advice From the Enchanted Forest, Part One

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2017, all rights reserved. Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Graphite on paper, 14 x 11"

$500 framed

Early Indications of a Conspiracy, Part Three

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2016, all rights reserved. Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Charcoal & pastel on paper, 40 x 30"

$2500 unframed

Early Indications of a Conspiracy, Part One

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2016, all rights reserved. Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Charcoal & pastel on paper, 40 x 30"

$2500 unframed

Early Indications of a Conspiracy, Part Two

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2016, all rights reserved. Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Charcoal & pastel on paper, 40 x 30"

$2500 unframed

Popcorn for Mrs. Leary

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2016, all rights reserved.  

Graphite & colored pencil on vintage ledger paper, 9.5 x 7.75"

$400 framed

Conundrum #1

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2016, all rights reserved. Photo by Jerry Mathiason.  

Graphite on paper, 19.5 x 27"

$900 unframed

Not Home

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Graphite, charcoal, carbon & pastel on Arnhem

22 x 14"

$1200 framed

This drawing was featured in Minnesota Monthly Magazine as part of its article, "Best Art of 2016."

 

Surveillance Series

I’ve been thinking about how much we’re all under surveillance these days. There are cameras in so many places that much of the time we don’t even notice them anymore. Corporations keep track of what we buy and observe what we look at online. There are countless security cameras everywhere, which can be both good and bad. On the generally less sinister side of things, ordinary people are curious about other ordinary people and pay attention to what they do. Your neighbor probably knows when you’ve gotten new drapes for the windows; the mail carrier knows your politics; and the recycling collector surely notices when you’ve just thrown out a box for a brand new computer. The more you think about various forms of surveillance, the more you realize how very deeply entrenched in our lives they are. 

It also occurred to me that we’re under observation by other living creatures, too. Birds and animals keep close eyes on us for their own safety and well-being. (At our house, they sit in the pine trees and watch for Food Guy to come and refill the feeders, and then run out to chow down the moment he’s back in the house). Are they watching us for other, mysterious reasons as well? Since we don’t understand their languages, we have no way of knowing. I love watching birds from my windows — but what are they thinking as they watch me? All living creatures must protect themselves from harm to survive, and that includes keeping an eye on the neighbors.

Don't Look

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Graphite on Canson vellum, 9.75 x 9.75"

$450 framed

Protection Series

Keeping oneself safe from harm is critical to all living beings. Plants and animals have all sorts of amazing adaptations for self-protection, from poisonous venoms to dramatic coloration that wards off predators. As endlessly creative human beings, we often go beyond what’s necessary (nuclear bombs) or craft odd, illusory forms of protection such as tinfoil hats, masks, blindfolds, conjuring and magical thinking. We use these tools to create a sense of safety, to find a way out of a tight space, or to frighten off someone else who might pose a threat. Where and how do we feel safe, and is that safety real or imagined?

Disguised

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2017, all rights reserved. Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Graphite on vellum, 9.5 x 9.5"

$450 framed

Keeping oneself safe from harm is critical to all living beings. Plants and animals have all sorts of amazing adaptations for self-protection, from poisonous venoms to dramatic coloration that wards off predators. As endlessly creative human beings, we often go beyond what’s necessary (nuclear bombs) or craft odd, illusory forms of protection such as tinfoil hats, masks, blindfolds, conjuring and magical thinking. We use these tools to create a sense of safety, to find a way out of a tight space, or to frighten off someone else who might pose a threat. Where and how do we feel safe, and is that safety real or imagined?

You Won't Know

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Graphite on Canson vellum, 10.75 x 9.75"

$450 framed

Protection Series

Keeping oneself safe from harm is critical to all living beings. Plants and animals have all sorts of amazing adaptations for self-protection, from poisonous venoms to dramatic coloration that wards off predators. As endlessly creative human beings, we often go beyond what’s necessary (nuclear bombs) or craft odd, illusory forms of protection such as tinfoil hats, masks, blindfolds, conjuring and magical thinking. We use these tools to create a sense of safety, to find a way out of a tight space, or to frighten off someone else who might pose a threat. Where and how do we feel safe, and is that safety real or imagined?

In Which We Narrowly Escape Being Overheard

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2016, all rights reserved.

Graphite on paper, 22 x 30"

SOLD

Shrimp Lo Mein

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  Photo by Jerry Mathiason. 

Charcoal & graphite on Somerset, 15 x 22"

$1200 framed

Surveillance Series

I’ve been thinking about how much we’re all under surveillance these days. There are cameras in so many places that much of the time we don’t even notice them anymore. Corporations keep track of what we buy and observe what we look at online. There are countless security cameras everywhere, which can be both good and bad. On the generally less sinister side of things, ordinary people are curious about other ordinary people and pay attention to what they do. Your neighbor probably knows when you’ve gotten new drapes for the windows; the mail carrier knows your politics; and the recycling collector surely notices when you’ve just thrown out a box for a brand new computer. The more you think about various forms of surveillance, the more you realize how very deeply entrenched in our lives they are. 

It also occurred to me that we’re under observation by other living creatures, too. Birds and animals keep close eyes on us for their own safety and well-being. (At our house, they sit in the pine trees and watch for Food Guy to come and refill the feeders, and then run out to chow down the moment he’s back in the house). Are they watching us for other, mysterious reasons as well? Since we don’t understand their languages, we have no way of knowing. I love watching birds from my windows — but what are they thinking as they watch me? All living creatures must protect themselves from harm to survive, and that includes keeping an eye on the neighbors.

 

I Know What I Saw (Ghost #1)

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2016, all rights reserved.

Cotton embroidery floss on Dura-lar, approx. 72 x 20"

$5000

A Small Botheration (Wee Ghost #1)

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2016, all rights reserved.

Cotton embroidery floss on Dura-lar, 12 x 9"

$400

Scattered

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  

Graphite on vintage ledger paper, 5 x 4"

SOLD

Red-Tailed Hawk Variations

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2014, all rights reserved.

Graphite on vintage ledger paper, 11 x 9"

SOLD

Ledger Paper Series

I enjoy working with found papers, including these pages from an accounting ledger that was serious business to someone in the 1970’s.  But how much does such a thing really matter within the larger context of our world?  Does it retain meaning once the company and people who worked there are gone?  Humans invest great importance in documents, yet they often have little regard for our irreplaceable natural world and feel free to scatter it with detritus and to destroy it in subtle and not-so-subtle ways.

In this series of drawings, I’ve juxtaposed often-unobserved creatures and natural objects with used ledger pages and text transcribed from found grocery lists.  These outdated documents form marks to which we are immediately drawn, and which offer enigmatic text and unsolvable puzzles.

No, Three

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2016, all rights reserved. 

Graphite on antique ledger paper, 11 x 8.5"

$400 framed

 

This drawing was made on 100-year-old paper.

Girls' Night Out

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.

Graphite on vintage ledger paper, 9.25 x 11"

$400 framed

Balanced Diet

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  

Graphite & gouache on vintage ledger paper, 5 x 4"

$85 in hand-labeled glass jar

Grocery List Series

The grocery list obsession arises in part out of my love of food and cooking; I’m fascinated by what other people put in their carts at the store.  I often try to memorize what folks in line are buying, if it’s interesting, to report on later at home.  “The woman in front of me had nothing but fifteen giant bottles of grape soda and three bags of frozen fries!”  It was a short step from that behavior to picking up abandoned lists from carts, the floor, the parking lot.  I don’t care if someone sees me diving for a list and thinks I’m nuts.  I love trying to figure out what menus people are planning based on their lists, and I enjoy the visual constructions, the handwriting, the scribbled out items, the organizational structure of each list.  The small mysteries are irresistible, and as a whole, my collection of lists offers a picture of one tiny slice of contemporary life in our city.

Two Tube Worms and a Rice Noodle

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2014, all rights reserved. 

Graphite on vintage ledger paper, 11 x 8.25"

$400 framed

Nest #1: Black Vulture

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2014, all rights reserved. 

Graphite on vintage ledger paper, 11 x 9.25"

$400 framed

Osprey Eggs with Erased List

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2014, all rights reserved.

Graphite on vintage ledger paper, 11 x 9"

$400 framed

Ledger Paper Series

I enjoy working with found papers, including these pages from an accounting ledger that was serious business to someone in the 1970’s.  But how much does such a thing really matter within the larger context of our world?  Does it retain meaning once the company and people who worked there are gone?  Humans invest great importance in documents, yet they often have little regard for our irreplaceable natural world and feel free to scatter it with detritus and to destroy it in subtle and not-so-subtle ways.

In this series of drawings, I’ve juxtaposed often-unobserved creatures and natural objects with used ledger pages and text transcribed from found grocery lists.  These outdated documents form marks to which we are immediately drawn, and which offer enigmatic text and unsolvable puzzles.

The Science of the Bat's Head Root

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2014, all rights reserved. 

Graphite on vintage ledger paper, 12 x 9.25"

$400 framed

You First

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  Photo by Jerry Mathiason. 

Charcoal on grey Strathmore, 7 x 18"

SOLD

Curiosity Cabinet #1: Three Eggs & a Cootie Catcher

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2014, all rights reserved.

Graphite on Canson vellum, 11 x 14"

$600 framed

Curiosity Cabinet #1:  Three Eggs & a Cootie Catcher

Cabinets of curiosities were the first museums.  People organized collections of objects in actual cabinets, or in rooms devoted to the purpose:  natural objects, natural history fakes, archaeological finds, religious and historical relics, antiques and objets d’art.  Humans just love to collect stuff and organize it and look at it and show it off.

This drawing is about my fascination with what I refer to as personal museums, the small curiosity cabinets we construct in our homes with found objects, souvenirs and inherited treasures.  Even the most tidy and spartan people I know have at least one tiny collection of objects they couldn’t resist.  Being neither tidy nor spartan, I have lots of collections.  This particular one, however, exists only in the drawing.  It reflects my fascination with the elusive beauty of birds’ eggs, and also gives a nod to something that I found to be mysterious when I was growing up:  the cootie catcher.  All the popular girls had them, but I wasn’t privy to the secret of how to fold one.  The closest I got was taking a turn at having my fortune told.  It was ages before I discovered that cootie catchers are actually easy to make.  This was perhaps the first time I noticed the way that status often depends upon illusion and on the ability to make more of things than they actually are.

Against the Cold

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2016, all rights reserved.

Graphite on bristol, 14.5 x 11.5"

$500 framed

Come Back Here With That

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Graphite on Stillman & Birn Zeta, 11 x 27"

$11 00 framed

Come Back Here With That

I’m fascinated by bumblebees, so I took a class from the U’s Bee Squad and found out all sorts of interesting things.  Bumblebees are northern creatures.  They have thick hair and antifreeze in their blood, and can actually buzz around working in temperatures just below freezing.  We have 19 species of them in Minnesota, most of which are not easy to distinguish from each other (believe me, I tried).  Bumblebees are incredibly important pollinators.  In fact, they’re more efficient at pollinating certain plants than honeybees are.  You can thank bumblebees for blueberries, cranberries, squash and melons.  

Bumblebees are fun to draw.  I love the way they hang in the air like tiny, fuzzy zeppelins.  They’re smart, and most of the species here in our state are not aggressive — no need to run and scream when you see one.  To my mind, they naturally lend themselves to the creation of visual narratives, and easily become characters in small dramas of my own devising.  

The lone bee in this drawing is flying as fast as she can to get away from the others, who mean to steal her list.  Yes, this bee is female.  See the wide sections on on her back legs?  Pollen baskets.  Only the females have them.  I did learn something in that class even if I still can’t tell a Bombus pensylvanicus from a Bombus auricomus.

Western Meadowlark, Protected

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  

Graphite on Terraskin, 3 x 2"

$65 in hand-labeled glass jar

Protection Series

Keeping oneself safe from harm is critical to all living beings. Plants and animals have all sorts of amazing adaptations for self-protection, from poisonous venoms to dramatic coloration that wards off predators. As endlessly creative human beings, we often go beyond what’s necessary (nuclear bombs) or craft odd, illusory forms of protection such as tinfoil hats, masks, blindfolds, conjuring and magical thinking. We use these tools to create a sense of safety, to find a way out of a tight space, or to frighten off someone else who might pose a threat. Where and how do we feel safe, and is that safety real or imagined?

Common Murre Variations

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2014, all rights reserved.

Watercolor pencil & graphite on crumpled vintage ledger paper, 10 x 7.75"

SOLD

There She Is

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2016, all rights reserved.

Charcoal on paper, 9 x 19.5"

$500 framed

Piping Plover, Protected

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  

Graphite on Terraskin

2 x 3"

$65 in hand-labeled glass jar

Protection Series

Keeping oneself safe from harm is critical to all living beings. Plants and animals have all sorts of amazing adaptations for self-protection, from poisonous venoms to dramatic coloration that wards off predators. As endlessly creative human beings, we often go beyond what’s necessary (nuclear bombs) or craft odd, illusory forms of protection such as tinfoil hats, masks, blindfolds, conjuring and magical thinking. We use these tools to create a sense of safety, to find a way out of a tight space, or to frighten off someone else who might pose a threat. Where and how do we feel safe, and is that safety real or imagined?

 

Northern Cardinal, Protected

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  

Graphite on Terraskin

2 x 3"

$65 in hand-labeled glass jar

Protection Series

Keeping oneself safe from harm is critical to all living beings. Plants and animals have all sorts of amazing adaptations for self-protection, from poisonous venoms to dramatic coloration that wards off predators. As endlessly creative human beings, we often go beyond what’s necessary (nuclear bombs) or craft odd, illusory forms of protection such as tinfoil hats, masks, blindfolds, conjuring and magical thinking. We use these tools to create a sense of safety, to find a way out of a tight space, or to frighten off someone else who might pose a threat. Where and how do we feel safe, and is that safety real or imagined?

We'll Come Back Later

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Charcoal on Lokta paper, 13 x 16.5"

SOLD

We’ll Come Back Later

Even friendly groups can form factions and suddenly become treacherous.  The raven skull provides refuge for this bumblebee as she figures out her next move.  The skull seems to make the other bees nervous — it’s good to have a friend you can trust.

 

Escape Plan

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Graphite on Stillman & Birn Zeta, 15 x 11"

SOLD

Escape Plan

This grocery list was a gift from a friend, something she pocketed after taking her father grocery shopping one day.  (Thank you, Amy!)  I treasure it because of the marvelous variety of items, the number of different cereals, and of course the Wheaties tag line.  What would a 92 year old guy in an assisted living be doing with that much cereal, a compass and a shiny new haircut?  Thus this drawing of a raven with an escape plan was born.

No Dessert

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2014, all rights reserved.  Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Graphite on Stillman & Birn Zeta

$600 framed

Grocery List Series

The grocery list obsession arises in part out of my love of food and cooking; I’m fascinated by what other people put in their carts at the store.  I often try to memorize what folks in line are buying, if it’s interesting, to report on later at home.  “The woman in front of me had nothing but fifteen giant bottles of grape soda and three bags of frozen fries!”  It was a short step from that behavior to picking up abandoned lists from carts, the floor, the parking lot.  I don’t care if someone sees me diving for a list and thinks I’m nuts.  I love trying to figure out what menus people are planning based on their lists, and I enjoy the visual constructions, the handwriting, the scribbled out items, the organizational structure of each list.  The small mysteries are irresistible, and as a whole, my collection of lists offers a picture of one tiny slice of contemporary life in our city.

Crow and Raven Worry About Plaza Curve

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.

White pencil on Stonehenge, 6.75 x 17"

$600 framed

Desert Power Struggle: Out of Blueberries

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2014, all rights reserved.  Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Graphite on Stillman & Birn Zeta

$600 framed

Grocery List Series

The grocery list obsession arises in part out of my love of food and cooking; I’m fascinated by what other people put in their carts at the store.  I often try to memorize what folks in line are buying, if it’s interesting, to report on later at home.  “The woman in front of me had nothing but fifteen giant bottles of grape soda and three bags of frozen fries!”  It was a short step from that behavior to picking up abandoned lists from carts, the floor, the parking lot.  I don’t care if someone sees me diving for a list and thinks I’m nuts.  I love trying to figure out what menus people are planning based on their lists, and I enjoy the visual constructions, the handwriting, the scribbled out items, the organizational structure of each list.  The small mysteries are irresistible, and as a whole, my collection of lists offers a picture of one tiny slice of contemporary life in our city.

Black-Capped Chickadee, Protected

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  

Graphite on Terraskin, 3 x 2"

SOLD

Crow Skull

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2015, all rights reserved.  

White pencil on Stonehenge, 2.75 x 4"

SOLD

Red-tailed Hawk Eggs with Erased List

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2014, all rights reserved. 

Graphite on vintage ledger paper

SOLD

Just One Piece

Copyright Terri Myers Wentzka 2017, all rights reserved. Photo by Jerry Mathiason.

Graphite & watercolor on vintage ledger paper, 15 x 12.5"

$500 framed

Gifts #1
Just One Piece sm.jpg
Conundrum #2
Advice From the Enchanted Forest, Part Two
Courageous
Preserved
You Can't See Me
Advice From the Enchanted Forest, Part One
Early Indications of a Conspiracy, Part Three
Early Indications of a Conspiracy, Part One
Early Indications of a Conspiracy, Part Two
Popcorn for Mrs. Leary
Conundrum #1
Not Home
Don't Look
Disguised
You Won't Know
In Which We Narrowly Escape Being Overheard
Shrimp Lo Mein
I Know What I Saw (Ghost #1)
A Small Botheration (Wee Ghost #1)
Scattered
Red-Tailed Hawk Variations
No, Three
Girls' Night Out
Balanced Diet
Two Tube Worms and a Rice Noodle
Nest #1: Black Vulture
Osprey Eggs with Erased List
The Science of the Bat's Head Root
You First
Curiosity Cabinet #1:  Three Eggs & a Cootie Catcher
Against the Cold
Come Back Here With That
Western Meadowlark, Protected
Common Murre Variations
There She Is
Piping Plover, Protected
Northern Cardinal, Protected
We'll Come Back Later
Escape Plan
No Dessert
Crow and Raven Worry About Plaza Curve
Desert Power Struggle: Out of Blueberries
Black-Capped Chickadee, Protected
Crow Skull
Red-tailed Hawk Eggs with Erased List
Just One Piece